“Shocking pattern emerges as latest Chevy Bolt catches fire – crucial warning for all owners!”

“Shocking pattern emerges as latest Chevy Bolt catches fire – crucial warning for all owners!”

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The Chevy Bolt recently had another fire on May 1st, just days after the “final fix” for the fire issue was announced. The owner of the vehicle shared his experience, stating that he unplugged his Bolt at 7:30am on May 1st after charging it overnight. He noticed the car had recharged to about 160 miles of range, which was more than enough for his local driving needs. The vehicle had been rarely used since it was purchased brand new in December 2018, with only 19,000 miles on it and no damage whatsoever. The owner received a recall notification which he intended to follow up on later in the day, but at around 11am, he noticed a strange smell coming from his garage. Upon opening the garage door, he saw that his Bolt was on fire, and it quickly engulfed the vehicle. The fire department arrived promptly and extinguished the fire, but the damages were significant – estimated at $235,000. The car’s battery fire caused flooding throughout the first floor of the owner’s house, and his motorcycle, which was also in the garage, was destroyed.

GM has confirmed that they are investigating the cause of the fire, but there are no official details available yet. The owner had not been directly contacted by GM at the time of his interview with Electrek, but they later reached out to him. A source at GM revealed that four of the six previous fires had a pattern where the owners would typically run the car low before charging it to full, which is why the temporary fix was to limit the charge to 95% to reduce the risk of fire. However, the temporary fix did not include any additional diagnostics or reporting, and there was no lower end limit. The owner of the vehicle that caught fire claimed that he rarely charged his Bolt to full, typically only charging it to around 75%, and that the car was unplugged at the time of the fire. This raises concerns about the effectiveness of the software fix and whether it is enough to prevent fires. There seems to be a trend emerging among the fires – five out of seven had similar charging patterns where the car was only charged once it was near empty, similar to how people use gas.

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